Addiction intervention is a pre-planned attempt by one or many people (family, friends, co-workers, neighbours) to get the addict to seek professional intervention, treatment for addiction, enter a drug rehab, alcohol rehabilitation, eating disorder, mental health, or dual-diagnosis treatment centre. Often interventions are held by family members and close friends and take place when other, more subtle approaches to getting help have been unsuccessful. Generally, there are two types of intervention – informal and formal.

An informal intervention is simply a conversation you might have with the person you are concerned about and sharing some of your observations, asking questions, and suggesting that (s)he seek qualified addiction treatment. Many centre interventions take place when a concerned friend, family member, or co-worker becomes concerned about an addict and does not want to include others at that time from fear of undesired tension between the addict and others. Informal interventions are a good way for a friend or co-worker to privately discuss their concerns with the addict without involving others. An informal intervention is most likely to have positive effects if it is well planned out in advance and takes place in a comfortable place when the addict is calm and sober.

Resources

  • https://silentgrapevine.com/2019/05/how-to-choose-the-best-drug-rehab-center-for-you-or-a-loved-one.html
  • https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/treatment-approaches-drug-addiction
  • https://www.findrehabcenters.org/addiction/how-to-choose-rehab-centers/