A few unknown facts about ecstasy addiction are listed here:

  • Ecstasy’s scientific name is “MDMA,” short for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine.
  • Ecstasy is synthetic, meaning that it does not come from a plant as marijuana does.
  • The Federal penalty for manufacturing or selling ecstasy can lead to fines of up to four million dollars. A ringleader or head manufacturer of ecstasy could receive life in prison.
  • The stimulant effects this drug, which enables users to dance for extended periods, may also lead to dehydration, hypertension, and heart or kidney failure.
  • Ecstasy can be extremely dangerous in high doses. It can cause a marked increase in body temperature (malignant hyperthermia) leading to muscle breakdown and kidney and cardiovascular system failure. Use may also lead to heart attacks, strokes, and seizures in some users.
  • The most effective treatments for drug abuse and addiction, in general, are cognitive-behavioral interventions that are designed to help modify the patient’s thinking, expectancies, and behaviors, and to increase skills in coping with life’s stressors.
  • For the third year in a row, the younger students surveyed reported a slightly weaker attitude about the risks associated with ecstasy use. The proportion of 8th-graders who perceived risk of harm from using ecstasy .occasionally. decreased significantly, from 52.0 percent in 2006 to 48.6 percent in 2007; this proportion also fell significantly among 10th-graders, from 71.3 percent in 2006 to 68.2 percent in 2007. The perceived risk of ecstasy use remained unchanged for 12th-graders from 2006 to 2007.
  • Approximately 860,000 Americans used ecstasy for the first time in 2006, which is a significant increase from the 615,000 first-time ecstasy users reported in 2005. Most (70.1 percent) of these new ecstasy users were 18 or older; and among past-year initiates aged 12 to 49, the average age at initiation in 2006 was 20.6 years.
  • No one knows how many times a person can use ecstasy before becoming addicted or who’s most vulnerable to ecstasy addiction. Genetic makeup, living environment, and other factors probably play a role in a person’s susceptibility to addiction to any drug.
  • 12th graders view even experimenting with most of the illicit drugs as risky. The percentages associating great risk with experimental use rank as follows: 60% for heroin without a needle and crystal methamphetamine (ice); 58% for ecstasy (MDMA) and heroin; 57% for steroids; 51% for cocaine; 48% for PCP; 47% for crack; 45% for cocaine powder; 41% for amphetamines; 37% for LSD; and 28% for sedatives (barbiturates).